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Posts tagged ‘advertising’

Daphne’s List of 7 (Part 1): Communications Strategies for Visionary Professionals

Daphne’s List of Seven (Part 1):

Top Seven Steps Towards a Comprehensive External Communications Strategy: For Visionary Professionals

Communicate YOU!

1. Determine one over-arching key message that defines everything you/your business does and stands for. Keep it genuine and values-centered. This message is a part of your branding and should not change unless determined that it is absolutely necessary.

2. From this, determine two – three key messages that target a specific audience, product/service you offer or initiative that you/your business is championing. This should directly branch off from the over-arching key message mentioned above and reflect the same values. These messages can change as products/services or initiatives change, launch or are emphasized, etc.

3. Media watch—pick three key topics that directly pertain to your business for you and your representatives to watch in media. This includes traditional media such as TV, newspapers, etc. and new media such as blogs and social networks.

4. Divide this media “chatter” by how your company will respond to this media content:

a) Using data from newly released reports/studies to craft your own position and statement using this data;
b) Supporting an initiative, idea, activity, etc. and including a fresh perspective or compelling story directly related to your business;
c) Denouncing an initiative, idea, activity, etc., including a fresh perspective or compelling story directly related to your business

5. Decide on the best avenue for addressing this media you’ve identified:

a) Press releases to staff writers, TV or radio
b) Query a feature story from a columnist, TV station
c) Draft a letter to the editor
d) Draft an article for a community publication
e) Submit an OpEd article as a guest columnist
f) Request TV interview
g) Request radio interview
h) New media: Blogs, Facebook, Twitter, etc.

6. Offensive media tactic—at least once per month, take an offensive stance on media relations. Utilizing the strategies d in number 5, pick unique angles on a story your business is passionate about, and work to get coverage in each of these media sectors.

7. Be the news—develop citizen journalism strategies to continue to get your messages out there. Think new media implementation. Write blogs and respond to blogs. Post on Twitter and Facebook. Use pictures. Develop a Vlog on YouTube. If your story will draw a broad audience, consider utilizing OhMyNews.com or other citizen journalism sites.

Nonprofits & the arts have something very special in common: OR what is values-centered branding

Nonprofits and the arts have a need to market products, services and messages just like any other business. They need followers, champions, spokespersons, supporters and customers for them to remain relevant, successful and sustainable. Yet, nonprofits and the arts have something very unique in common when it comes to their communications strategy development. Something that sets them apart from any other type of business. They organically speak to man’s need and unique ability to imagine and create. A nonprofit imagines a world that is better and works to create that world through education, service, empowerment, advocacy and faith. Artists look at the world or imagine new worlds and create music, art, poetry, theatre, dance and other forms of expression to communicate these new worlds or new perspectives on the world with their audiences.

The result is something very intimate and profound. This intimacy and profundity is the basis for communications strategies as it pertains to nonprofits and the arts.

Identify the intimate and profound values of your creations, your dreams–what your imagination and vision tells you the world is or should be or could be or just “Wow, that’s so strange, I just can’t stop looking!”

This is your value-centered branding. This will be the foundation for your communications strategies that will speak directly to the values of your audience.

Examples of values-centered branding: hope, passion, health, liberty, commitment, pain, joy, success, community, anarchy, freedom, humor, control and never forget “cool.”

Note that not all values have to be positive. Some might seem rather benign, and you can still find an eager audience focusing on the darker side of nature. The point is, this isn’t about judgement; it’s about finding an authentic voice for your values-centered branding.

Yarn Tank: The Daily Green

Nonprofits and artists represent the human spirit directly.

The next step is finding your audience–your particular public who will find that your values mirror theirs and theirs yours. This is the foundation for deep loyalty. Not one to be taken for granted, but one that has the potential to become very intimate and steadfast. If courted and nurtured properly, your following, based on shared values, can become unbridled public champions on your behalf.

Want to know more? Contact me daphnestreet@daphnestreet.com Web: www.daphnestreet.com How can I help you?

SERIOUS ABOUT GAMES: Games can be serious business for ALL serious businesses

Use games right, and you will create a viral wave of your brand that will prove to your public you are strong, creative, valuable and clever.

Gaming: Serious Business

Games can be a truly interactive communication medium that can add significant value to your brand when woven into a comprehensive communications strategy.

By now, businesses are getting the picture that to stay relevant in the public, be valuable and strengthen branding for business development and sustainability, it’s necessary to look at that scary abyss of communications strategies fearlessly.

But why games?

Like all things–not just any games. They have to be good games. They have to speak to your particular brand. They have to be easily transferred via email or social nets. They have to entertain and engage. They have to promote your brand in a clear but inviting, energizing, motivational way. (Remember to market values).

Depending on your budget, you can do this at low-cost or high cost with custom-designed games that immerse players into your branding universe.

If the game is “cool” enough, players will pass on links, embed in their sites, etc. Now players are doing your advertising for you.

Think GAMES.

Below is information about a blog that explains this more in-depth. Please click on the link below and find much more information. The part about ad-supported gaming is towards the middle of their blog (as of right now). Great stuff! Thanks Digital Worlds!

Digital Worlds – Interactive Media and Game Design
A blogged course production experiment…
http://digitalworlds.wordpress.com/

From Blog Post AD SUPPORTED GAMING posted 10/27/08
Here is a description of using a game AS an advertisement
“Advergames are games that are heavily branded and as such essentially “are” the advert. Advergames typically present a game world that reflects the advertiser’s branding, or at least the message the advertiser wants to communicate, and in so doing potentially engages the interest of the player for many valuable minutes in what advergame developer Skyworks calls ‘branded interactive entertainment’”.

From Blog Post MAKING CASUAL GAMES PAY posted 10/28/08
A grrrreat! description of embedding ads in casual games
“Casual games are seen to be similar to television sitcoms in that ‘…in exchange for the ability to play and be entertained for a short period of time, people are willing to watch ads’ (these ads correspond to the interstitial or pre-roll ads that were described in Ad-Supported Gaming). However, it is also possible “to integrate dynamic in-game advertising platforms into the game. [That is, in-game advertising.] With the constant connection, the adverts can be altered based upon a player’s moves, or even their geographic location, providing targeted and more effective advertising. … It wouldn’t be surprising if in-game ads soon become integral to the content of a game, offering clues, extra levels or other hidden rewards for the player who clicks through.” In-game advertising, even in casual games, offers the potential for interaction. By engaging the player emotionally in the game, they may well be forced to pay more attention to the promotional message or advertised goods (for example, if you have to go in search of the missing Nuvo Cola can…!)”

For more information contact me daphnestreet@daphnestreet.com website: www.daphnestreet.com

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